Online e-course

Keeping Up with Karlyn II

Lesson Syllabus

BECOME A MEMBER

Learn By Doing

These lessons have been carefully selected to inspire and motivate you to play with watercolor and mixed media. This e-course focuses on “off the beaten path” techniques that will move you towards a more non-traditional approach.

Lesson Introduction

LESSON 1

Flowers...Going Beyond Realism:

capturing the essence of recognizable subjects

LESSON DESCRIPTION

This lesson is a balance of negative and positive painting. Blending the background with your subject or blending one shape into another will add variety to your composition. A lot of this relationship is actually a spontaneous and intuitive process. Just let it happen. This first lesson will focus on semi-abstraction. My love for realism and my love for abstraction comes together in this lesson. To begin, study your subject and decide on the shapes, colors and textures you want to use in your painting, Some parts of the subject may be painted more realistically and other parts may be more abstracted. Push and pull the tension to arrive at a semi-abstract interpretation. This lesson allows us to focus on the elements of design and to express ourselves in a very personal way.

The key focus in this lesson is the balance of negative and positive painting and lost and found edges. We are trying to capture the essence of a flower, both familiar and sometimes made up. We will start with a spontaneous, free underpainting and later try to pull in a bit of realism.

We will push and pull this tension to arrive at a semi-abstract interpretation. Blending the background with our subject or blending one shape into another will add variety to our composition. A lot of this relationship is actually an intuitive process. So, just let it happen. This lesson will focus on semi abstraction. My love for realism and my love for abstraction comes together in this lesson. To begin, study your subject and decide on the shapes, colors and textures you want to use in your painting, Some parts of the subject may be painted more realistically and other parts may be more abstracted. Push and pull the tension to arrive at a semi-abstract interpretation. This lesson allows us to focus on the elements of design and to express ourselves in a very personal way.

Process:
1. This lesson starts with a wet into wet underpainting. While the surface is wet, take some risk and add BRUSHO and salt and even throw some sprinkles of water onto the surface. This breaks up the surface and makes it possible for you to find floral shapes. Just for fun, cut up wax paper and let it drop onto the wet surface. Taking some risks in this early stage will result in these lovely textural surprises. Let this underpainting dry.

2. Begin finding your flowers and either draw in those shapes with an HB pencil or negatively paint around the shapes. The biggest challenge is that you do not paint around the entire shape. This will kill the fresh look you are trying to attain. Select about three places to define the flower and leave the other sides without definition.

3. When you paint the flowers keep the petals light against the dark background and paint the petals dark against the light background. Leave much of the background as the underpainting, try not to overwork your composition. Remember we are trying to only capture the essence of flowers and leave some of the areas as abstraction.

4. The final touch is to add your darkest darks. Remember to not overdo this path of dark, just get in and get out and lose the edges.

MATERIALS LIST

Watercolor Paint
• BRUSHO. (These are highly-pigmented, transparent watercolor/ink crystals. You can sprinkle the powder with a dry brush or dissolve the crystals in water or simply sprinkle from the jar. They are non-toxic and non-hazardous. They have been around for over 35 years.)
Arches 140# paper

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 2

Designing Expressive Lines

a triple header

LESSON DESCRIPTION

DRIZZLE ZEBRAS

1. The first lesson is to learn how to “drizzle” a line using GLOSS black acrylic. We will use a satay stick to drizzle the paint. Drizzling creates a line with character that varies from thick to thin and swings from in control to out of control. When you choose line the main means of expression, you can create an exciting and unique linear interpretation of just about any subject. Lines, either passive or dynamic, are an element of art that can pack powerful emotion and strong design. These black and white subjects are very popular. When framed, they fly out the door. The Gloss acrylic found at Walmart is the only acrylic paint that I have found that will drizzle off a stick. I have tried many brands and drizzling of a stick is not one of the qualities found in acrylic paint. The good new is that there is one a new product called “Tar gel” available that will make any acrylic drizzle. One of the brands is Golden Acrylics. This image used the drizzle method primarily, but the eyes, nose and the circular dots were created with the gutta bottle for more control.

PAINT THREE ROOSTERS ON A FENCE OVER GUTTA BOTTLE LINES

2. The second lesson is these roosters perched on a fence using the Gutta Bottle filled with acrylic. I used the number 5 tip on my gutta bottle. My goal is to capture them in the early morning as they begin their busy day and to make them really colorful and full of personality.

PAINT ZEBRAS OVER GUTTA BOTTLE LINES

3. Gutta bottle: Any acrylic paint can be used to fill the gutta bottle…GLOSS or Matt. I used the number 5 tip on my gutta bottle. After four trips to South Africa, I find zebras a very appealing subject. They love to cuddle. We will paint the zebras with a wet into wet approach. Draw the lines that define the zebras using the gutta bottle. Allow to dry. Wet the paper back and front and paint the subject wet into wet. I painted the stripes with Quinacridone gold, Quinacridone burnt orange and cobalt blue. I added manganese blue for a cool background. When the underpainting is dry, finish with a few hard edges.

MATERIALS LIST

GLOSS acrylic paint from Walmart to drizzle
Any acrylic for the gutta bottle
Satay stick. A tool used to drizzle the paint.
Gutta bottle. Available at our online store. Includes the tip.
# 5 tip for thinner line using the gutta bottle
#7 tip for thicker line using the gutta bottle.gutta bottle
Tar gel (to make any paint drizzle, available through Golden, optional)
Gloves in a bottle. (Apply to your hands, it is like an invisible glove. Optional)

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 3

Abstracted Buildings

Going beyond the boundaries of realism & perspective.

LESSON DESCRIPTION

3. Abstracted buildings

We will take liberties with painting buildings in a semi-abstract design. We will take the rules we learned in one and two point perspective, understand them and just do our own interpretation. We will superimpose building shapes over a fun and free abstract underpainting. We will welcome textures and surprises and unpredictable happenings. We will work spontaneously, instead of meticulously and rejoice instead of render. Starting the painting with a wet surface creates a spontaneous spirit. The wet paper also takes away some of the intimidation we feel when we look at a dry, white paper. As you add color, it flows, moves and creates energy all by itself. Painting actual realism can be tedious and not inspiring, but by working with the suggestion of reality and not allowing yourself to get bogged-down with the precise depiction of reality, this is a big step in breaking the boundaries of realism. This is a perfect time to show paintings that relies more on emotions, feelings, shapes, colors or anything the artist conceives to represent buildings. Many of these artists are painting their emotions more than reality. This “sense” of the subject is what I am interested in today….not the precise image. Some artists that I like that have this interpretive style are:

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

Credit card, sprayer, paint and paper

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 4

Painting Flowers Over a Gessoed Surface

LESSON DESCRIPTION

This technique is an exciting experience because you paint on a surface that has magical qualities. As you apply color, textures just happen. After the paint dries, you can lift the paint very easily. The surface is similar to YUPO, except YUPO never absorbs the color, it simply dries on the surface. Gesso actually absorbs the color. I find this surface user friendly and very desirable.

 1. Select either a new piece of watercolor paper or a “failed painting”. I enjoy using a failed painting because gesso is a water-based paint and it draws out some of the color from the failed painting and leaves beautiful soft tonal areas. You can gesso the other side of the paper after it dries, this gives you two choices and also keeps the paper from curling.

2. Begin by applying gesso onto the surface using a flat brush. If you want a more interesting surface, add more gesso and troll the surface with your painting knife to create textures.
Use the tip of your painting knife or a sharp object to make thin lines, optional. Press leaves, burlap or any texturing object onto the surface for additional textures. I also like to spray water with my fine mister to soften the edges of the paper, similar to a vignette style of working.

3. Allow to dry, preferably over night. It is Ok to use a hairdryer to speed up the drying. Painting the other side when this dries will keep the paper from curling.

4. Draw your subject with a pencil and begin painting on this exciting surface.

5. Your final painting must still be presented like any watercolor by placing it under glass. You can also finish the surface with Krylon acrylic spray, either Matt or gloss. Another option is to apply a coat of Dorland’s wax.

WATCH THE PREVIEW

MATERIALS LIST
  • White Gesso. (Comes in clear, white, black, gold, I prefer white)
  • Painting knife, Matt board scraps
  • Flat brush
  • Any paper, canvas, Masonite board, mat board or a failed painting
  • Any texturing tools
  • QOR watercolor medium. Optional choice to use, adds a shine to the finish.
  • Daniel Smith ultramarine turquoise watercolor (new color I chose because it is transparent,  non-staining and granulates)
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 5

Gold Gesso and Watercolor

LESSON DESCRIPTION
  1. Improvisation with control using gold gesso, spray paint and watercolor.

This gold gesso produced by Daniel Smith was introduced and loved, then they discontinued the product and happily it is now back and all artists are rejoicing. You can use this product as a ground for your watercolors. You will experience some resist but you will love your results. I like to combine the gold gesso with my traditional watercolor subjects because it adds a little bling.

  1. Draw any subject with an HB pencil. I find fruit or vegetables to be a colorful and perfect subject for this team of unique materials. I choose radishes for my demo because our son has a restaurant called the Fat Radish and this leafy, colorful subject with a trailing root is a perfect subject. Treat the subject like an abstract design, carefully overlapping and interlocking the shapes throughout the composition.
  2. Design and paint in a dark path of color behind and around your subject negatively to create a strong contrast.
  3. Paint gesso in all other background areas making sure to have a lost edge as it leads into the dark path.
  4. Paint the subject by setting the shape and dropping in the color. Enrich the color harmonically.
  5. Here is where the fun really begins, using a metallic spray and a stencil, place the stencil in a position to help construct a subtle background. Really enhances the composition, because you are so close to your work, be careful of the overspray. It is best to spray outside and wear a mask.

 

Download PDF (Click here)

WATCH THE PREVIEW

MATERIALS LIST

Daniel Smith Gold Gesso
Stencil
Metallic spray paint

Colors Used

Quinacridone Gold
Antwerp Blue
Windor Yellow
Scarlet Lake
Quinacridone Burnt Orange
French Ultramarine Blue

You can order paints HERE

 

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 6

Semi-Abstract Themed Watercolor

LESSON DESCRIPTION
  1. Semi-Abstract Themed Watercolor.

When painting an abstract that contains some realism, this impressionistic style of working leaves a lot of interpretation to the viewer. You want a subject that excites the viewer, that contains little recognizable material and actually forces them to use their own interpretation. I think looking at an abstract is like listening to poetry…the experience portrays just the essence and often this touches the viewer more than pure realism.

Select a theme like Africa, any travel experience, fall leaves, grapes, etc, and start observing what colors represent this theme and what textures reveal the essence of your theme. Then collect labels, napkins, papers, event tickets, any mixed media that can enhance this theme. These collage materials breathe in a new reality to your painting.

Step by step instructions:

  1. Start with a small sketch of shapes. Wet your paper on both sides and start laying in the color.
  2. While still wet, add paper, labels, napkins and anything that will perk up the soft color.
  3. Add gauze for lines. Allow to dry and glue any collage materials in place with YES Paste.
  4. Use stencils and watercolor pencils for additional color and texture. Be sure to wet the surface before and after you sand.

Bonus lesson: This is a preview for our next lesson. This lesson was actually started with an abstract pour and later was changed to a “less is more” interpretation. The poured piece felt like a great back drop for one of my favorite subjects, San Marco in Venice. Enjoy

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST
Colors Used 
  • Scarlet Lake
  • Manganese Blue Hue
  • French Ultramarine Blue
  • Quinacridone Burnt Orange
  • Antwerp Blue
  • Quinacridone Gold
  • Raw Sienna

 

Shop Paints

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 7

Guest Artist

Kathie George

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Click on the lesson to see description and lesson materials.

You can download and print.

Little French Pitcher Batik

Download PDF (Click here)

WATCH THE PREVIEW

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 8

Painting milkweed

LESSON DESCRIPTION

A subject that has fascinated me for ages is dried milkweed. The flower is also beautiful, but the dried subject is really fun to paint. Add to this intrigue, the fact that this is the only food that monarch butterflies eat and live on and this adds a lot more interest. You can find out which milkweed plant thrives in your area, plant it and help the monarchs survive.

Step by step instructions:
1. Draw your subject with an HB pencil. Apply the masking using the fine tip to create the lovely lyrical movement of the escaping seeds. I like to overwork this part….more seems to be better than less.

2. When the masking dries, wet both sides of the paper. We are going to make an underpainting to set the stage for our final painting. Create a focus of light using a primary yellow, primary red and primary blue. Keep spraying until the colors move together into a glowing, radiant look. Continue to add quinacridone burnt orange, cobalt blue and maybe some quinacridone gold, keeping directional movement in mind. Add some darks to the pods. When the colors are about to lose their sheen, add table salt in the white shapes only.

3. Continue adding darks to pop out the exploding seeds.

4. Remove the masking and add some soft shades of color to adjust the whiteness. Use your scrubbier brush to soften some of the whites. Add your final darks.

MATERIALS LIST
  • Masking in a bottle with a point .08 tip for fine lines
  • Sprayer
  • Table salt
  • Scrubber
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 9

Abstract Pouring and Mixed Media

LESSON DESCRIPTION

The key focus in this lesson is the balance of negative and positive painting and lost and found edges. We are trying to capture the essence of a flower, both familiar and sometimes made up. We will start with a spontaneous, free underpainting and later try to pull in a bit of realism.

We will push and pull this tension to arrive at a semi-abstract interpretation. Blending the background with our subject or blending one shape into another will add variety to our composition. A lot of this relationship is actually an intuitive process. So, just let it happen. This lesson will focus on semi abstraction. My love for realism and my love for abstraction comes together in this lesson. To begin, study your subject and decide on the shapes, colors and textures you want to use in your painting, Some parts of the subject may be painted more realistically and other parts may be more abstracted. Push and pull the tension to arrive at a semi-abstract interpretation. This lesson allows us to focus on the elements of design and to express ourselves in a very personal way. The images below have no pencil lines.

Process:
1. This lesson starts with a wet into wet underpainting. While the surface is wet, take some risk and add BRUSHO and salt and even throw some sprinkles of water onto the surface. This breaks up the surface and makes it possible for you to find floral shapes. Just for fun, cut up wax paper and let it drop onto the wet surface. Taking some risks in this early stage will result in these lovely textural surprises. Let this underpainting dry.
2. Begin finding your flowers and either draw in those shapes with an HB pencil or negatively paint around the shapes. The biggest challenge is that you do not paint around the entire shape. This will kill the fresh look you are trying to attain. Select about three places to define the flower and leave the other sides without definition.
3. When you paint the flowers keep the petals light against the dark background and paint the
petals dark against the light background. Leave much of the background as the underpainting, try not to overwork your composition. Remember we are trying to only capture the essence of flowers and leave some of the areas as abstraction.
4. The final touch is to add your darkest darks. Remember to not overdue this path of dark,
just get in and get out and lose the edges.

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

Watercolor Paint
• BRUSHO. (These are highly-pigmented, transparent watercolor/ink crystals. You can sprinkle the powder with a dry brush or dissolve the crystals in water or simply sprinkle from the jar. They are non-toxic and non-hazardous. They have been around for over 35 years.)
Arches 140# paper

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 10

How to Paint Where the Sun Don’t Shine

LESSON DESCRIPTION

How to paint where the sun don’t shine.

I have experienced traveling to a location and there is no sun. I either chose a place where “the sun will never shine”, which I have done on a number of occasions or the sun simply is not out. When this happens, I create my own “path of light” and simply paint the subject over this underpainting. In fact, I travel with pre-painted underpainting with this pattern of light on them. You simply use all the skills you know about painting your subject and this lovely “path of light” will shine through your final painting.

There are no special materials needed for this lesson.

Prepare an underpainting and draw over this toned paper. When there is no sun to create the cast shadows, it is a real treat to just draw over toned paper and create the illusion of adding sun.

Bonus lesson. Path of light on a wet surface is easy and fun. Pages 42-43. Greece. WWB, 2010. Demo 9

Bonus lesson. Creating a path of light on dry paper-learning to color

“Outside the lines”. Prague WWB. 2010. Demo 11.

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

There are no special materials needed for this lesson.

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 11

Creating Textural Surprises or Planned Accidents

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Creating Textural Surprises or “Planned Accidents”.

Double feature.

Try creating an accident on purpose by  preparing the paper surface before you begin the painting. Enhancing the paper surface to set
the stage for spontaneous and unpredictable effects is an exciting option. I really believe that structure and spontaneity can go together. You have often heard the phrase “structure kills creativity”, well I am hereto disprove that theory. I plan to share with you a sense of playfulness and fun as I carefully show you step-by-step demonstrations. I want you to create successful watercolors. When you truly become immersed in watercolor and find the techniques that work for you, you are on your way to discovering your own fun and free style.

Materials:
YES Paste
Unryu collage paper
Ogura
Ripped up failed paintings

On location painting:
1. Preparing the paper surface before you begin painting is an exciting option. You are creating an “accident waiting to happen”. When you apply paper to this enhanced surface, the color absorbs into the surface unevenly and many surprises appear. You are setting the stage for unpredictable and spontaneous effects to happen. What could you add to induce a “planned accident”? For this demonstration, I plan to use several Oriental papers named ogura and unryu papers and YES Paste to glue these papers down over a 140# Arches paper. When you paint over these papers, the colors literally absorb into the paper and paints itself.
You can paint your subject with shapes and textures and color and ignore the traditional light on the subject. Create meaningful textures and and just enjoy the bumpy surface as you rejoice in
the resulting surprises.
2. Glue textural papers over a drawing controlling the areas where
you want these “planned accidents”.

Download PDF (Click here)

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 12

Guest Artist

Barbara Barrett

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Barbara Barrett is a professional artist and watercolor teacher who resides in Kinsale, Ireland. Barbara was born in South Africa and resided in this country for many years.
She now organizes exciting art tours to this country and to Ireland. Karlyn and Barbara have led four tours to South Africa.
The Winsor Newton watercolor markers are a highly pigmented water-based marker. They come with a dual tip, one with a fine nib and the other like a big brush. They come in 36 brilliant colors.

LESSON 13

Birds and Surf and Sailboats in the Sunset

A double feature of alla prima approaches

LESSON DESCRIPTION
  1. Birds and surf. I plan to paint busy shorebirds with breaking waves. This subject is exciting to watch and even more fun to paint.
  2. Sailboats. Filmed before a live audience in August, 2019.

Water is a marvelous subject because this transparent liquid reflects light, creates dynamic contrasts and moves. The best approach to painting water is to put down the color on a wet surface and then lift it away.

Wet-into-wet is a fun process of discovery. The way the colors meet and mingle creates a glowing effect. This birds and surf lesson uses wet-into wet and randomly dry paper. Each surface gives a very different effect and ultimately looks like waves breaking. You actually are in charge and by throwing, dropping and lifting you can create the movement of water. I plan to show you an approach to create this movement in the water and as you try this process, you will discover your own approach.

Using Arches 140# or 300# paper is the best choice. This paper has good sizing on the front of the paper and this allows the colors to move around and be lifted to form the surf. The sizing in Arches keeps the paint from soaking into the paper and allows lifting. A paper that is not properly sized will not work.

This is an alla prima or “all at once” experience. You need to let the colors intermingle and then lift the colors without any interruptions or distractions.

Enjoy this magical time because when you are finished, you should not go back and do more to your painting. This will destroy the “alla prima” look.

I finished the painting by mixing Quinacridone burnt orange with ultramarine blue to form a dark black. I like this color because it is a non-staining mixture and allows me to lift if necessary.

  1. Sailboat was filmed before a live audience in August of 2108. The sailboat as drawn and protected with clear masking sand my sun/moon was cut out of wax paper. I started by wetting the paper on both sides and featured a focus of light using Aureolin yellow, Quinacridone coral and cobalt blue. The mountains were created by lifting the color with a tissue. The moon was placed onto the wet surface with the grain in a horizontal position. The entire painting was completed with the same triad of color.

With the mixed colors of the original triad, namely aureoles yellow, cobalt blue and Quinacridone coral, I mixed a grey-downed purple and finished the silhouette of the sailboat.

3. Finished a sailboat painting using a Rembrandt triad of Quinacridone gold, Quinacridone burnt orange and Indigo. I added the darks to the sail. Quinacridone gold in the water and scratched out some final whites in the surf behind the sailboat with a razor.

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

Arches 140# or 300# paper is the best choice

Quinacridone: burnt orange, ultramarine blue, coral, cobalt blue, gold and Indigo

Aureolin yellow

tissue

a razor

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 14

Less is More

LESSON DESCRIPTION

14. Less is more

I absolutely love paintings that fall into the category I call “less is more”. I have been working in this direction for years. Every time I go out on location, I try to paint the essence of what is there and not take in the entire scene. I usually accomplish this by observing the scene and selecting the most appealing subject. If I am excited about the subject, my work shows this enthusiasm. I pick the theme and apply all my energy into that area and either leave out or simplify the rest of the subjects.
Materials:
*HB pencil
*Archival ink pen, I used a Staedler, Mars Graphic black pen
*140# cold press watercolor paper
*Watercolors

 

 

 

Step one….drawing the scene This lesson was filmed live in Nerja, Spain, 2019. This is a busy city on the Mediterranean Sea with lovely
shops and a beach. This was my practice drawing that I did with no pencil drawing, just diving right in with my permanent black pen. I chose a street scene and tried to simplify the interpretation. This could be the mantra for most paintings, it is better to ask, “what can I leave out rather than what can I add”.

On the 15 minute live on location drawing, I drew over an under painting of old world colors made with quinacridone gold, quinacridone burnt orange and indigo blue. Again, I did the sketch with no pencil lines.

 The sound on the video was spotty so we left in some live parts and the rest was completed with voice overs.
When painting “en plein air”, you experience the changing light, birds chirping, kids running, music playing, wind howling and so much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step two….painting the drawing.
First of all, I introduce previous paintings I have done in this style of less is more. Then i paint over my morning on location practice drawing in the comfort of my make-shift studio in Spain. I chose limited colors and concentrated on developing good values only in the interest area. The areas I painted formed a cruciform placement of the interest subject. I added some red color for a little punch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This painting I decided to use more color. These all white buildings in Spain can be frustrating when you want to use color, so I just let the color flow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step three….a startling event inspired me to finish this painting by using a new app.

This is the new app….Mobile Monet. It is $1.99 in your App Store. I found it very easy to use and in my quest to put the final touches on my painting, I found this app very helpful. My friend Mary Jane shared this app at just the moment I was struggling to finish this painting. I selected one of my reference photos and put it in the app. As you will see in the subsequent final painting, this app saved my painting. The first thing this app does is take your photo and reduce the image to three values. Then you can select the parts of the image that you want to add or delete color. This unique way to select the parts you want to add color Is perfect for this “less is more” concept. You can play around with your images on your I-Pad and explore possibilities that have great values and then select the areas to emphasize with color. Fun, fun, fun!

 

 

 

 

 

These three photos show the first value sketch that happens when you put your photo into this Mobile Monet app, the second photo shows how I only painted in my interest area. The third photo shows how adding the red lettering over the awnings really finished the painting.

Step four…finishing the painting on my return home from Spain.
This photo shows the final interpretation I painted after I played around with my new app, the Mobile Monet. I added the intense reds over the awnings and some additional red highlights.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The initial colors in this second painting were so bright that I layered the complementary color of permanent magenta over the bright colors. This layering tool and the final addition of the lettering over the awning also put the final touches on this painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are some of my “less is more” paintings over the years of International travel. The first two are the backyard of a pub in Ireland; the third photo is a small village in Provence. The first photo is in Bulgaria; the second photo is a small village in Spain and the third photo is in a flower market in France.


This first picture is a little slice of life in the city of Cortona, Italy. The next painting is the San Marco Basilica in Venice. I really enjoyed painting these on location because I didn’t have to do all the details, just the interest area.

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST
  • HB pencil
  • Archival ink pen, I used a Staedler, Mars Graphic black pen
  • 140# cold press watercolor paper
  • Watercolors
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 15

Elegant Writer Pen

LESSON DESCRIPTION

The elegant writer pen has been my “go to” pen for over nineteen years, I love this pen because it helps me to loosen up and create expressive-looking paintings. I think any subject can be interpreted with this tool. My favorites are roots and rocks, landscapes, still life, flowers, animals and even portraits.
Materials:
Extra fine-tipped elegant writer pen
140# Arches paper
Facial tissue without lotion
Ruler
HB pencil
Archival fine tipped black pen, size .05.
Round brush, any size, I prefer a # 8.
T-square, transparent plastic preferred
Quinacridone Sienna
Nicole Azo Yellow
Salt

Step by step lesson:
1. Draw the subject with an elegant writer pen. The pen can be used to develop darks and lights as well as grey tones. Hold the pen upright to make a very decisive and dark line. Turn the pen on its side to make grey-toned lines.
2.Another choice is whether to add shapes within your drawing. If you decide to make shapes, use a black, archival permanent pen to make the lines. Be sure to use an archival black
pen with about a .05 tip. Using a ruler, break up the shapes so some of your subject is breaking out of the shape and other subjects are designed to be inside the shape. I personally love this break out idea, it can be one shape or
many shapes working together.
3. Draw your subject and keep a tissue handy to dab anytime the line becomes too heavy. Carefully wet the subject with a round brush. The most important
response is to be ready to dab away any wet ink that rushes too much. As you dab away, you will notice that it leaves a red afterglow. You need to dab right away because if the ink dries, you cannot dab it away anymore. When the ink dries, it becomes stable and you can paint over the color without reactivating the ink.
Download the PDF

MATERIALS LIST
  • Extra fine-tipped elegant writer pen
  • 140# Arches paper
  • Facial tissue without lotion
  • Ruler
  • HB pencil
  • Archival fine tipped black pen, size .05.
  • Round brush, any size, I prefer a # 8.
  • T-square, transparent plastic preferred
  • Quinacridone Sienna
  • Nicole Azo Yellow
  • Salt
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 16

A Spontaneous and Random Approach to Starting Your Painting and How to Finish Your Painting with a Veil of Light

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Starting with a blank white paper is intimidating. This lesson is about starting spontaneously and randomly…..a very liberating way to begin. In my online class, one of my goals is to try and show you how to use materials and techniques that may be helpful for you to find your own personal “spark”. I started out trying to paint exactly what I saw. I developed basic skills in drawing and painting but then I felt a need to go beyond realism. I am hoping to inspire you to move to a more personal and individual style. In this lesson, we will start will a random approach to planning your composition.

Then for the final strokes in your painting, I will show you how to add whites with a thinned gesso that forms a “veil of light”. Another goal in this lesson to create a full range of values in your painting.

A problem that happens over and over again is repeating the same abstract design over and over. I find when I work from a pre-drawn thumbnail sketch, I keep painting the same idea over and over again. As soon as we find success with a design, we tend to repeat this same composition. Insider breaking out of this success binge and push yourself in a new direction. This random, drop the tissue approach is great for coming up with a unique composition. Usually I plan a cruciform composition but this drop the tissue approach is strictly random. Let it happen. You still need to use the principles of design to finish the painting, but at least the initial approach is fresh

 

Step by step instructions:

  1. Starting with dry paper, drop tissues to form your basic composition. Draw around the shapes with a pencil and remove the tissue. Add color into these areas where the tissue dropped.
  2. Select a warm or cool color and develop these shapes into a flowing design of analogous colors.
  3. Add Unryu collage paper into these colors and spray well with your fine mister so the papers absorb the color. The color will appear darker.
  4. Add napkins, more color and develop textural excitement into your painting.
  5. Place plastic wrap over the light areas. This will allow you to add darks and create lovely textural areas in these light areas.
  6. Add stretched gauze and add more color over the gauze to add linear touches to your composition.
  7. Add the final darks onto the wet surface and let these papers and gauze dry. Remove the gauze and glue down the collage papers.
  8. The final step was to add lines with a pencil and start painting in a path of darks. These shapes were design to lead the viewer through the painting in an entertaining

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

Gesso

Tissue

HB pencil

Plastic wrap

Gauze

Old credit card

1/2” flat brush

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 17

Guest Artist Wei Lan Lorber

Watercolor on Masa Paper... Guest artist Wei Lan Lorber and Karlyn

Double feature.

LESSON DESCRIPTION

1. Wei Lan will present a lesson on Masa paper. This traditional Asian (Oriental) style of painting can be a “new look” for any subject you chose. Buildings, still life, flowers, landscapes. Still life…any subject can be enhanced by trying this special paper. The finished painting looks like a batik with soft crackles in the background.

2. Karlyn will paint Koi. Japanese Masa Paper fractures the color into a beautiful network of lines similar to those found in Batik. The process is mostly wet-into-wet and results in beautifully textured areas that are perfect for painting Koi. Masa paper has a smooth and a rough side. You can work on either side, it all boils down to what you prefer. I like the smooth side, so mark the paper as smooth or rough before you begin the wetting process.

Can download the Koi photos and cut them out. One set is swimming one way and the other is reversed. (Click here)

Karlyn has enjoyed painting flowers using this paper and technique.

Koi on Masa
Prepare ahead: Stir together 90% Elmer”s Glue-All (not school glue) to 10% water. (I have a bottle for each of you)

Step One: Cut out the fish and place them on the masa paper. Think about overlapping some fish and take into account the directional movement they create. Draw around the fish on the smooth side of the masa paper with a HB pencil. Take a photo on your phone or IPad.

Step two: Follow the next set of directions carefully.
*Carefully crinkle avoiding long strait lines. Do not over crinkle.
*Soak in room temperature water for one minute.
*Place on a towel and gently press to remove excess water. Turn and do the other side.
*Place masa on a support like 140# paper. Place paper on plastic to avoid gluing your paper to the board.
*Lift back half the paper, drizzle glue onto the support paper and spread it out with an inexpensive bristle brush. Be sure to spread the glue beyond the edge of the paper.

*Roll out from the center of the paper with a brayer, being careful not to create creases.

*Repeat gluing and rolling on other half.

*Separate the plastic from the masa paper and throw away the plastic. Place on a board and softly roll again, check the edges in case they lifted off.

Step three: Apply paint to the fish and enjoy the batik-like crinkle-effect that just happens all by itself. After you are happy with the fish, add some color into the background to set the crinkle. Be sure to repeat some of the fish tone colors into the background.

Step Four: Add the darks to the background. This was really fun, just popping out the fish by adding darks and bright colors. I added full strength yellow to make the water on the green side. I also added quinacridone burnt orange and Antwerp blue for a very dark green. Adding the pure Antwerp blue was the most fun. Finding the rocks later was easy. I never drew in any rocks, they just appeared as I was adding the darks.

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

*Old towel
*Cheap bristle brush (.59 at a hardware store)
*Brayer
*Backing board like plastic, wood or foam core
*140# paper (this does not need to be Arches, any old 140# paper will
work.)
*Plastic wrap like Saran wrap
*masa paper (available at our online store)

MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 18

Monoprints..

LESSON DESCRIPTION

The art of mono-printing combines painting, drawing and printmaking,
allowing you to make one of a kind images. The images are reversed and
many factors are at play so that you create a unique image. The amount
of ink used, the suction from the lifting, the many surprise smudges from
touching the paper and many other factors influence the final result.

Step by step directions:
1. I chose masa paper for my preferred paper.. This strong, yet
lightweight paper is perfect for mono-printing. Masa paper has a
smooth side and a textural side, and you may use either, but I prefer
the smooth side. You can use the paper as is or you can prepare an
abstract composition of random, collage paper such as pre-stained
unryu, napkins, Ogura or any papers you prefer. Glue the papers down
with thinned YES Paste and allow to dry. Creating these textural
surfaces can lead to surprising and whimsical results.

2. Apply water-based printing ink to a plexiglass plate using a very small
amount of this water-soluble ink.

3. Use a brayer to work the ink up and down and back and forth until is
sounds sticky. Carefully place a piece of smooth masa paper or a paper
that has been prepared with collage face down onto the wet, inked
surface. Try not to touch the surface of your paper as this will form
smudges. The ink will hold the paper in place.

4. Draw your image on the paper with a sharp tool such as a ball point
pen. Keep the line work fresh and unique.

5. Lift the image from the plate. (You can do a mono print of the image
left on the plate is you wish.)

6. Allow the image to dry and then paint with watercolor. You can enrich
the surface by adding color sanding, brushwork, more collage papers or
watercolor crayons.
Bonus or Encore: Creating a unique line using mono-printing. Page 52-53.
WMM, 2013. DVD Lesson # 3

 

Download PDF (Click here)

 

MATERIALS LIST
  • Acrylic plate
  • Masa paper
  • Collage papers like unryu, ogura, etc
  • YES Paste
  • Water-based printing ink
  • Ball point pen
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 19

Spontaneous Flowers

LESSON DESCRIPTION

19. Spontaneous Flowers.

The style of painting flowers that I am sharing today is very appealing and will help you on your way to painting fresh, free and spontaneous florals. There are many ways to accomplish this ‘alla prima” look, but the easiest is to paint on a wet surface. Most watercolor painters are concerned about painting both the positive and the negative space, but this lesson focuses only on the positive shapes. The so called “negative” areas just happens by the moving wet paint. I drew the subject with a permanent black ink pen. Then I “randomly” wet the background and as I added the watercolor, it just flowed into this wet space. This creates soft and hard edges that adds variety. I also like to throw the paint to keep this spontaneous look. This throwing technique also creates hard white shapes in your focal area.
Step by step instructions:
1. Draw your image using a permanent pen. Randomly wet around the shapes of the flowers and the leaves. Then throw the scarlet lake color into the dry areas of the geraniums. The throw alizarin crimson to form the darkest reds. Because this area of the paper is dry, this will save white shapes. Paint some of the outer flower shapes around the geraniums and allow this soft color to bleed into the background.
2. Paint directly on the dry leave shapes with a primary yellow. I used Windsor yellow.
3. Now paint quinacridone gold on and over the Windsor yellow. Finally add Antwerp blue over the yellow and gold and still restraining yourself to save some whites.
4. Make a dark green by combining one part quinacridone burnt orange and two parts Antwerp blue. Select only a few dark areas on the leaves.
5. Paint the pot with quinacridone burnt orange. Add additional cobalt blue for more darks.

 Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST
  • Staedtler black permanent pen
  • Arches 140# cold press paper
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 20

Designing Multiple Images

LESSON DESCRIPTION

This type of abstraction entails designing space so that the separate elements selected as your subject work as one.
Pick a theme like seasons, flowers, a special place, butterflies, etc and start placing the images together. Keep in mind the transitional areas and connecting shapes and lines must work
together. Usually the key to a successful multiple space image is unified color and movement. This style of abstraction entails designing space so the painting portrays multiple interpretations of a similar subject. Pick any theme like cycles of a flower or butterflies, seasons, rocks, reflections or water. The challenge is to paint with directional movement that flows within believable boundaries so the
piece does not look patched together.
Most of these paintings are from multiple sources, such as photographs, life, memory, imagination and now the internet. Embrace this diversity, you need to break away from the comfortable and familiar route. Take some risks and enjoy the freedom to design your paintings in several segments that work together.

Guidelines to achieve a sense of unity in your design:
1. Connecting lines of movement.
2. Varying size of relationships.
3. Balance shapes, such as positive next to negative, realistic next to abstract.
4. Work on transitional areas so they connect naturally
5. Do a unifying color start. (Focus of light). Place tape first.
6. Contrast. Design smooth surfaces next to textured, busy next to quiet, darks next to lights, cools next to warm, soft next to crisp. (Add cut shapes of collage and add to painting)
7. Use lost and found edges, Allow some edges to disappear and lead the eye to the adjoining area by using similar values next to each other or by leaving a rest area.
8. Connecting linear shapes. This provides directional movement and rhythmic patterns that entertain as well as guide the viewer from one shape to another.
9. Draw your subject. (Birch trees and rocks)
10. Wet the paper and place collage papers and color freely over the subject.
11. After the paper dries, glue down the collage papers ad allow to dry again.
12. Tape the picture into segments.
13. Finish with hard edges.

A. Designing a landscape theme. In this lesson, I plan to combine organic, as well as geometric elements. This combination creates wonderful visual tension. I chose birch trees for my vertical shapes and rocks for my horizontal shapes to interlock and integrate the composition.
B. Watercolor and drawing. I have always loved this look of areas left as a drawing and other areas painted.
C. Watercolor and watercolor pencils

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST
  • Ruler
  • Multiple references of the subject
  • Collage papers (optional) Arches 140# paper
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 21

Guest Artist

Bonnie Broitzman

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Bonnie is guided by her spiritual journey and expresses her paintings and poetry with a meditative, intuitive and spontaneous approach. She listens to her intuitive voice, and this trust in her inner self allows her to paint in an improvisational approach, allowing the colors and shapes to evolve into a finished painting.
Bonnie will share her insights into creating a painting by intuition. Bonnie has created her lovely paintings by wetting the paper, applying the color and just letting the images appear.
She will narrate and demonstrate her approach to letting a painting happen as she is in a meditative mood.
Materials are simply paint, brushes and paper.
Bonnie is an intuitive/meditative artist who approaches painting as a spiritual experience where she trusts the paint to reveal her inner voice through the use of the elements of art. Watercolor is a perfect media for this creative process of letting fluid, free-flowing paint express her inner
feelings. Watch Bonnie as she starts with a wet mix of free-flowing color and brings these lines, shapes and colors into a finished painting. All the years of painting realistically prepared her for this artful, intuitive style of expression. This reflective style of painting is a form of prayer. Bonnie is also a poet and often writes poetry that inspires her painting subject.

This style of abstraction entails designing space so the painting portrays multiple interpretations of a similar subject. Pick any theme like cycles of a flower or butterflies, seasons, rocks, reflections or water. The challenge is to paint with directional movement that flows within believable boundaries so the piece does not look patched together.

Most of these paintings are from multiple sources, such as photographs, life, memory, imagination and now the internet. Embrace this diversity, you need to break away from the comfortable and familiar route. Take some risks and enjoy the freedom to design your paintings in several segments that work together.

Guidelines to achieve a sense of unity in your design

1. Connecting lines of movement. (Show Drawing)

2. Varying size of relationships. (Show how to break up the space)

3. Balance shapes, such as positive mix to to negative, realistic next to abstract.

4. Work on transitional areas so they connect naturally

5. Do a unifying color start. (Focus of light). Place tape first.

6. Contrast. Design smooth surfaces next to textured, busy next to quiet, darks next to lights, cools next to warm, soft next to crisp. (Add cut shapes of collage and add to painting)

7. Use lost and found edges, Allow some edges to disappear and lead the eye to the adjoining area by using similar values next to each other or by leaving a rest area.

8. Connecting linear shapes. This provides directional movement and rhythmic patterns that entertain as well as guide the viewer from Ione shape to another.

Draw your subject. (Birch trees and rocks)

Wet the paper and place collage papers and color freely over the subject.

After the paper dries, glue down the collage papers ad allow to dry again.

Tape the picture into segments.

Finish with hard edges.

1. Designing a landscape theme. In this lesson, I plan to combine organic, as well as geometric elements. This combination creates wonderful visual tension. I chose birch trees for my vertical shapes and rocks for my horizontal shapes to interlock and integrate the composition.
2. Watercolor and drawing. I have always loved this look of areas left as a drawing and other areas painted.
3. Watercolor and watercolor pencils

 

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST
  • Watercolor paint
  • Brushes
  • Paper
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 22

Drawing "Zentangle-like lines"

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Lesson 22. Drawing “Zentangle-like lines”

This lesson is addicting…read with caution. Zentangle is a perfect name for this lesson. The word “Zen” implies meditation and the word “tangle” implies interlacing patterns. I am suggesting that you try this approach to enjoy this meditative style of drawing. If you type in zentangle on the internet, you will find lots of rules, videos, patterns and apps available to follow. Most of these presentations are very regimented. Years ago, Karen Knutson and I were looking for a more personal and creative approach. We each followed our own drawing style and found our own personal approach that is relaxing and even addicting.

Materials:
Archival pen
Any paper
Woody by Stabilio

I had a very exciting experience recently at my Cheap Joes workshop. A artist came up to me and asked me to chose one of her beautiful Zentangle original designs. She had page after page of these colorful
doodles. They had to take hours and she asked me to pick one out as a gift. When i picked one, she ripped it out of her tablet and gave it to me. I was touched and really impressed with all the creative energy she actually had spent on these drawing and she just gave one to me! What a gift. Another interesting thing is the number of adult coloring books available using this style of drawing.

Step by step instructions:
On my recent trip to teach in Australia, I taught this Zentangle lesson to my class. We had visited a koala sanctuary and got to see and photograph this amazing animal. Koala’s have pouches because they are a marsupial, native to Australia. They eat only Eucalyptus leaves and because this diet does not provide much nutrition, they sleep 16-18 hours a day. For my lesson, I plan to draw koalas.
Step by step:
1. Draw your placement with an HB pencil. As soon was you are comfortable with your composition, immediately switch to the pen. Now be free and just
go for it. Let the pen dance around the surface and find details and shapes. To make values, this is when you begin the zentangle part. Make a shape with your pen and fil it in with lines or patterns. This popular style of doodling or drawing is very addicting and an enjoyable way to approach drawing.
2. When you are ready to add the dark shapes with the woody, simply wet the pencil with a wet brush and brush away.

My friend karen Knutson and I years ago wanted to add more drawing to our classroom programs and started working on an idea started by Paul Klee called “take your line for a walk”. We would draw by looking at the subject as much as drawing the subject and adding abstract designs into the background. Karen really took off with this idea and calls her technique “wire drawings”. Her students love her approach and she has inspired her students, as well as herself to spend more time drawing these beautiful design-filled drawings. These ideasketches then inspire them to paint in this semi-abstract style of painting. You can see the variety of subjects that Karen has selected such as birds and figures.
Another popular subject Karen has chosen is “funky women”. She and her students have had so much fun tackling this unusual subject. Karen also focuses on landscapes, farm scenes and total abstraction.
I have always felt that drawing is an important part of being an artist. I wanted to add a drawing lesson to this course that would be as entertaining as it is beneficial. When we visited this colony of South African penguins in 2018, I was overcome by the interesting markings on their bodies and their overall appeal in their body movements. They were always interacting with one another and almost posing for these photos. I took lots of photos and could not wait to start drawing these cute little guys. I added the Zentangle-like lines to form the dark shapes. It was easy to do and any subject will work.
My simple rules:
Design a shape and then by repetition start filling in these shapes with lines and patterns. You are already on your way to designing your own “tangles”. Do not limit yourself to non-objective design, try subjects with realism too. Add darks and color if desired. Remember there are no mistakes.

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

Materials:

  • Archival pen
  • Any paper
  • Woody by Stabilio
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

*Disclaimer – Example of Lesson. Not the actual lesson.

LESSON 23

Fun and Free Gestural Abstraction

LESSON DESCRIPTION

Line is the easiest and most popular way to convey an idea. As kids, we freely drew our ideas and as we grew older, we became more tentative. This lesson is designed to be an inspiration for you to return to these free linear starts you did as a child. Just take risks and play. When we paint abstractly, we keep the joy of discovery and the creative process alive. Many abstract artists are attending classes on expressive drawing with Steven Aimone to “free the artist within”. They work primarily with line and shape, the first exercise they perform is to scribble lines on large sheets of paper as a preparatory way to free up their mindset. This idea inspired me to design a
lesson using this important visual element of “gestural Line”.

I studied art in college in the late 50’s and Abstract Expressionism was a big part of my art training. The word expression means a personal experience expressing your creative self. This really describes this movement well because it was non-commercial, experimental and utterly personal. This movement gives you permission to paint whatever you want to. You must trust yourself. This philosophy is what guided my experiences when I started painting. Many of these artists worked almost exclusively in line. I painted large abstract oils all the while I was home with my children. Here are some of the artists who made history with their linear concepts.

  • Willem DeKooning
  • Jackson Pollock
  • Joan Mitchell
  • Jose Parla
  • Mayako Nakamura

Step by step instruction:

1. Select your favorite colors and use these colors as your inspiration to make your own collage paper. Place a toilet seat cover over a small plastic bag. Using selected colors, color this biodegradable, tissue-like paper with color. The papers easily rip and form interesting edges and shapes. Do not be careful, actually push the paper and create very tortured edges. Allow to dry and peal free from the plastic.

2. On 140# dry paper, freely draw lines and shapes with a black or any color, watercolor pencil. Let this freedom be a joyful experience. Glue down collage papers with thinned YES Paste. Be sure to put YES Paste under the collage paper as well as on top of the collage paper. Press hard so the collage paper adheres to the 140# paper. Add collage papers to enhance the gestural movement already created by the lines.

3. You can allow this underpainting to dry or simply start wetting the surface to activate the lines very carefully so as not to disturb the glued down papers. If they move a little bit, simply put them where you want them. Wet these lines with a gestural movement, leaving some areas dry. Keep in mind “lost and found” areas. Add more color and spontaneously approach adding more texture, color and lines to finish your painting. Color sand some areas to soften and create transitional areas. Add salt in transitional areas. Allow to dry.

4. Finishing the painting on dry paper allows you to develop more crisp areas, develop more darks, key up the colors, add more collage and enhance the values. Add more lines with your watercolor pencil.

5. Always spray any painting that has non-archival collage papers or metallic spray on it with Krylon acrylic gloss spray. This will help to archive those questionable materials.

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST

Materials:

  • 140# paper
  • Watercolor pencil or Caron d”Ache
  • watercolor crayon
  • Colored pencils
  • 100-grit sandpaper
  • Stencils
  • Salt
  • Credit card
  • Stamps. Stamp designs on unryu paper for use to create transitional areas.
  • toilet seat cover (transformed into collage paper)
  • Small plastic bag to support the toilet seat cover
  • YES Paste
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

LESSON 24

Guest Artist David Smith

Painting Landscapes with a bead of color

Filmed in Venice in September, 2018 on location. Double Feature

 

LESSON DESCRIPTION

I will illustrate painting figures under umbrellas on rainy streets starting at the top of the paper and moving down the paper. We will be starting with dry paper and applying wet color. Sometimes we will be working with a “bead of color” and other times we will be working around a subject so it will remain white. This style of working has a lot of control. It is still possible to change the color instantly and create a very wet into wet look. This direct style of painting also uses gravity to move the color. The final painting has wet, misty appearance that has few hard edges and a fusion of colors.

Materials are traditional watercolor, brushes, 140# Arches watercolor paper, tape and a quarter sheet board.

Step by step instructions.
1. Draw your subject with an HB pencil. Place drawing on rolled tape to secure the paper on all sides. Place the upper part of the board on about a three inch rise. Start your painting at the top of the paper and proceed down then paper.
2. Continue adding color and charging in more color as needed.
3. Throw the foliage using an Asian brush.
4. continue adding color horizontally in the foreground. Layer on more darks and make the figures in shadow.

I learned the lesson of painting with a bead of color in 1983 from Frank Webb. This painting of Venice illustrates the “bead of color” moving down a skyline in Venice. I originally painted this style of applying paint to a dry surface with more control. David Smith joined me on a recent International painting trip and volunteered to share his style of painting with a “bead of color” with us. It is listed below as a bonus lesson

Bonus lesson by David R. Smith, filmed live in Spain on September 15, 2018.

David presented a technique using a bead of color on dry paper. This technique is really fun to watch, the color changes are very exciting.
This was accomplished by painting a relatively thick paint on a dry surface with gravity pulling the paint down in a “bead” of color. He painted a wet on dry paper street scene photographed in Malaga with figures. He painted in three steps. The first stage was premixed thick and creamy watercolors placed on dry paper with the paper placed on an angle. Gravity moved the color down the paper as he added and
controlled the color, saving the whites.
After the first wash dried, David added darks, foliage and interesting darker shapes to the action line.
After that dried, he added details to the figures and reflections of the figures in the foreground

Download PDF (Click here)

MATERIALS LIST
  • Traditional watercolor
  • Brushes
  • 140# Arches watercolor paper
  • Tape
  • Quarter sheet board.
MEMBERS

Already a Member? SIGN IN HERE

To Become a Member CLICK HERE

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!